A Word About The George Zimmerman Trial

Dear Friends,

As I sit here at my desk, stumbling upon ostensibly endless ways to distract myself from the work I have piling up next to me, I cannot help but take notice of our Nations current infatuation with the State of Florida v. George Zimmerman. The entire situation has me thinking about our Country and the Justice System in general. As of the time I write this post the jury in the case is about to begin deliberation. Before the verdict is delivered I figured I would share some of my thoughts:

Trayvon Martin is dead. He was shot and killed on February 26, 2012 in Sanford, Florida by George Zimmerman. Trayvon Martin was only 17-years-old. This is a human tragedy of immeasurable proportions. Trayvon Martin was just a child and now he is gone. These are simply facts.

Criminally charged with Trayvon Martin’s death is George Zimmerman. A 28-year-old neighborhood watch coordinator who has asserted self-defense as a justification for the killing. Regardless of the jury’s verdict, Zimmerman’s life with be forever altered by these events. These are simply facts.

For the past several months the media and public at large have viewed this case, and the impending verdict, as some sort of reaffirmation of their views regarding racial profiling, racism, gun rights, stand your ground laws, etc. These are all important issues that should be thoroughly debated. I, however, have chosen a different approach today.

Regardless of the outcome of the State of Florida v. George Zimmerman, I choose to view the jury’s verdict as a win for the people of the United States.

Beyond a reasonable doubt is the highest standard of proof that must be met in any trial. It is the standard that must be met by the prosecution’s evidence in a criminal prosecution: that no other logical explanation can be derived from the facts except that the defendant committed the crime, thereby overcoming the presumption that a person is innocent until proven guilty.

If George Zimmerman is found guilty of any of the charges levied against him, I choose to believe it is because the State has met its burden.

If George Zimmerman is found not-guilty on all charges against him, I choose to believe it is because the State has failed to meet its burden.

I choose to believe that the system works because the lawyer in me tells me so. I choose to believe that the system works because the American in me tells me so.

We have seen people assert otherwise in high profile cases before. Just recently, much of America was convinced that Casey Anthony murdered her own child in cold blood. The facts of the of the case seemed to suggest she probably did murder her own child in cold blood. I tend to believe she probably did. I also believe the jury returned the proper verdict.

Beyond a reasonable doubt is the highest standard of proof that must be met in any trial. It is the standard that must be met by the prosecution’s evidence in a criminal prosecution: that no other logical explanation can be derived from the facts except that the defendant committed the crime, thereby overcoming the presumption that a person is innocent until proven guilty.

O.J. Simpson. We all remember the O.J. trial. It played out right in our own living rooms. Much of America was convinced that O.J. murdered his ex-wife and her lover in cold blood. The facts of the case seemed to suggest he probably did. I tend to believe he probably did. I also believe that the jury returned the proper verdict.

Beyond a reasonable doubt is the highest standard of proof that must be met in any trial. It is the standard that must be met by the prosecution’s evidence in a criminal prosecution: that no other logical explanation can be derived from the facts except that the defendant committed the crime, thereby overcoming the presumption that a person is innocent until proven guilty.

Our Justice System places this burden on the State because we live in a Country that believes it is better to let twenty guilty men go free than wrongfully imprison one innocent man.

I choose to believe that if George Zimmerman is found guilty it is because the system worked. I choose to believe that if George Zimmerman is found not-guilty it is because the system worked.

Sincerely,

Rob

For the Firm